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Recent Topics on the Cloudforest

How does Mexicola avocado rank in taste?

by tuttifrutti » 2 days ago in Fruits, Rare Fruits, Orchards and Exotics

How would you describe its taste, texture, oil content,...?
I've only been eating Haas, since it's readily available. I see HD has a bunch of Mexicola, wondering if it's worth it to plant one.
Thanks,

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Large-leaf Rh., one fast growing Rh. and Pseudopanax

by Vlad Pomajzl » 2 days ago in Pacific Northwest

I don’t have as much experience as George, John and others have with the above and I am also GOTE with respect to many other posters here so I lumped my story into one, separate post.

Although mainly known for some of its exotic gardens located at milder parts of Saltspring (Zones 8(b), 9(a)), the island has plenty of cooler valleys and high elevations in the 7(b) or 8(a) Zones and I happened to be 600ft up with mainly northeast orientation, which can’t be classified higher than the 8(a) Zone based not only on winter average minimums but also on periodic damage to various tender plants I have experienced over the 36 years here.

But there are always surprizes either way of the damage scale. Take, for example Pseudopanax ‘Sabre’. Although planted on the house and protected (some would say shaded) by a much larger Camellia on the soth side I didn’t expect it to survive the two cold spells of the last winter, yet here it is, with just a few fried leaves. There was no overhead and/or supplemental heat protection, I didn’t even mulch the plant:

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This true R. sinogrande has truly humongous leaves. I had a bamboo stick and plastic overhead and that was it, just to minimize the potential snow damage (our garden received 0.5 m (1.64 ft) of snow early in February:

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Here is another plant that was given to me as R.sinogrande with a warning that it could be a hybrid with some hardier species. It does have somewhat smaller leaves than the Rhodo above and has survived some nasty frost since planted in (I believe) spring of 2008. The one in front is an early blooming, hardy and fast growing (i.e. of potential interest to Roger) R. barbatum. Their native habitat is much of the Himalayan Range where this species frequently reaches tree proportions:

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These last two are beauties. No protection except straw mulch around the root zone. The one to the right is the fragrant and reportedly tender R. edgeworthii and the one behind to the left is a cross R. sinofalconerii:

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rhodoleia henryi

by georgeinbandonoregon » 3 days ago in Pacific Northwest

speaking of new plants to play around with and plant. has anybody had any experience with rhodoleia henryi---an evergreen witch hazel relative from southern china? got mine from woodlanders last fall and it sure is a pretty thing with very dark shiny leaves with the potential to become at least a large shrub/small tree and it's supposedly hardier to cold than the more common (and IMHO rather tender r. championii). since it was in a pot and i only had one i brought it inside during the coldest periods this winter so i can't say for sure what it might have done if left to fend for itself. love to hear reviews and results on this plant from anybody who would care to share.

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Milk Kefir grains available

by RodneyS » 3 days ago in Urban Homesteading

I make DIY milk kefir at home, and often have extra grains to give away. Let me know if you'd like some, either trade, lunch or the cost of shipping

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Pawpaw sapling to a good home

by savoiu » 3 days ago in Exchange Scions

I have 1 such sapling.

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