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A forum about growing citrus and tending citrus orchards, discuss the myriads of citrus varieties, and cooking and processing citrus fruit

Source for citrus rootstock for grafting in the SF Bay Area?

Postby J.Valenzuela,Novato » Mon May 30, 2011 9:35 pm

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Which nursery do you order seedling citrus rootstock from? I was looking at TreeSource, or Willits & Newcomb. I am going to call each of them tomorrow, but wanted to get your advice if you had dealt with either.

Which are the preferred varieties for grafting a wide variety of citrus (like Joe Real's 100 variety citrus tree). I was only really considering a Poncirus trifoliata seedling????

I am trying to gather up some folks in our local CRFG chapter to place an order for citrus scions with the CCPP, but I would like to make some rootstock available too.

Thanks for your advice.

Re: Source for citrus rootstock for grafting in the SF Bay A

Postby Axel » Tue May 31, 2011 9:39 am

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I don't know of any nurseries that sell rootstocks. The way citrus is propagated is by rooting cuttings that are already bud grafted. So the whole thing is done is one full swoop.

You will want to get a hold of trifoliate wood and root the cuttings. I've also used cuban shaddock with good luck. Mandalo is also a great rootstock.

Re: Source for citrus rootstock for grafting in the SF Bay A

Postby padsfan » Tue May 31, 2011 5:44 pm

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Most nurseries in so cal grow rootstock from seed then bud at pencil size. I would recommend trifoliate for a semi dwarf tree or c-35 for "standard" both will not overgrow certain citrus like mandarins but will not be compatible with eureka lemon types.

All my in ground citrus is on c-35 rootstock and I am very happy with the vigor, production, and quality so far.

Re: Source for citrus rootstock for grafting in the SF Bay A

Postby Laaz » Sat Oct 22, 2011 11:25 am

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All rootstock is grown from seed. If you plan on doing a lot of grafting, I would recommend planting a tree or two of your desired rootstock for future seed.

Re: Source for citrus rootstock for grafting in the SF Bay A

Postby NoMoreNicksLeft » Sat Oct 22, 2011 7:52 pm

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The only place I'm aware of that sells trifoliate seed is in Alabama, Sand Mountain Herbs. Crop failure this year, he has none. Sucks, because I wanted to grow some this winter inside under the lights... our drought (Texas here) killed all of mine from last winter, I should have taken them back inside once I saw how bad it was, but I kept holding out that they'd adjust and that my watering would be enough.

What are the details on California's citrus quarantine, could you even ship seed legally or not?

I've also got a few Sevilles, somehow a couple survived. Might get some seed of those to start some again this winter.

Re: Source for citrus rootstock for grafting in the SF Bay A

Postby Laaz » Sun Oct 23, 2011 5:10 am

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If you're in TX you should have no problem getting seed. I use three types of rootstock, Trifoliata / Trifoliata (Flying Dragon) / Swingle. All do great here in the southeast & should do great in TX from what I know. You should be able to find all of these in TX.

Re: Source for citrus rootstock for grafting in the SF Bay A

Postby Laaz » Sun Oct 23, 2011 6:20 am

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And if you work the rootstock varieties into your landscape it works very well, with a endless supply of rootstock seed every year. :lol:

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Re: Source for citrus rootstock for grafting in the SF Bay A

Postby NoMoreNicksLeft » Sun Oct 23, 2011 8:51 am

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I can order just about any scion from Weslaco, I've emailed the guy in charge and they even have stuff not on the list, supposing you only need a few buds/sticks. But finding a source for seed is a bit more difficult. The Seville seed I got from someone in Austin about to chop down their tree for landscaping reasons (at least that's what he claims they are, the leaf shape's a little weird for Seville, I suspect it's a hybrid).

Trifoliate though? No one's selling it retail in North America except that one place. There's another place in the UK that lists it.

As for growing my own... it's on the list of things to do, but you still have to find the seed once somewhere, and then wait 7 years for it to start fruiting.

Re: Source for citrus rootstock for grafting in the SF Bay A

Postby Laaz » Sun Oct 23, 2011 9:15 am

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Trifoliata only takes 3-5 years to fruit from seed. Trifoliata also contain up to 30 seed per fruit. If you need some seed of trifoliata PM me. I have both standard & Flying dragon.

For larger trees you may want to look into swingle. I have used both sour orange & swingle, and swingle has worked best with better hardiness every time.

Re: Source for citrus rootstock for grafting in the SF Bay A

Postby NoMoreNicksLeft » Sun Oct 23, 2011 9:45 am

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I think I would prefer dwarfed trees. I'm in an area of Texas where it's pretty crazy to think I can grow citrus... and I've got the idea in my head that when the coldest parts of winter come I'll erect tents of some sort around the trees. Going to do some experiments to see just how much that'd raise the air temps here this winter.

As for the sour oranges, I'm only keep those for the few things that aren't graft compatible with trifoliate. It's dumb, and I don't really expect those to survive long-term, but I have a pathological need to attempt the impossible.

Last year we had a once-in-ten-years winter with nearly a week down around 0F. Most winters January will be the worst, and hovers in the mid 20s. Always windy though, and the chill factor might make that more like in the teens. I intend to bring the trees inside while they're still small... and only plant permanently in the ground once they're much larger.

Also, thank you for the offer Laaz. I think I may take you up on that.

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