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A forum for growing fruits and rare tropical and temperate fruits, and tending our orchards

Bonny doon and parrish avocado

Postby Axel » Wed Apr 06, 2011 6:11 pm

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Location: Santa Cruz Mountains
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I just picked up my avocados from Freddy and Ellen, I picked up a Bonny Doon avocado and a Parrish avocado. Both are local Santa Cruz heritage trees. Parrish is a very large black skinned fruit bigger than Mexicola. The original tree was planted in the 1920's and is very large now, this is a late ripening fruit.

The Bonny Doon variety is a very early fruit, green skinned and won last Fall's avocado tasting, outdoing all of Julie Frink's southern California grown gems. It's incredibly precocious and does very well in cool coastal areas. The original tree is on the Sant Cruz Westside.

Re: Bonny doon and parrish avocado

Postby RobertS » Wed Apr 06, 2011 7:34 pm

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Cool Axel, local Avo's grow them well so you can post pictures of the fruit one day. I love local grown old avocado trees I'am hoping to get some scion wood of a couple of local avo's from Jack S. he has some Santa Maria locals.

Re: Bonny doon and parrish avocado

Postby Axel » Wed Apr 06, 2011 10:57 pm

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I'd love to hear about these local avocados from Santa Maria. What interests me about Parrish is that it's a Black skinned Mexican style avocado that is both round and large. I love the pure Mexican avocados because you can eat the skin and it tastes like anise. It's quite tasty that way. And the round ones typically are not stringy, so this one is very unusual sounding.

Anyway, we need more backyard avocados instead of the boring "perfect" looking Hass style avos.

Re: Bonny doon and parrish avocado

Postby Jack, Nipomo » Thu Apr 07, 2011 6:56 am

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The two avocados from Santa Maria are old dooryard trees that are huge. The fruit is round and they have a thick skin that removes effortlessly. Good flavor, no fibers. They are at different parts of town, one named Bruce, the other Alvin. The names are associated with public schools located near the trees. Obviously the trees have survived freezes in Santa Maria, and the cool windy climate. Could be named varieties, but lost in history. Grafted last year to rootstock in the ground, they have grown about 3 ft. above the graft union. So Robert, there is plenty of scionwood, now's the time.

Re: Bonny doon and parrish avocado

Postby Axel » Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:01 pm

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We need to make some efforts at promoting these varieties. They are our local heritage trees and are worth preserving, especially if they are so well adapted to the Central coast.

Re: Bonny doon and parrish avocado

Postby DavidLJ48 » Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:19 pm

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Cool, Kern has gotten me involved in similar fun, collecting local avocado tree scion wood. Some here are seedlings, and some have been smuggled in from Mexico apparently.

I have newly grafted seedlings, from some scion wood from Fremont, the owner told the local CRFG member who collected the wood and regularly buys the fruit. That the tree and two others planted there, are or where known variety's. One of the fruits seems to be a Bacon from the sample I ate, and a Mexicola from the description.

But the one the local members really like, is a very large, like 1 pound long neck large fruit with a somewhat thin green skin, but not as thin skinned as most. Very nice and creamy fruit, mild taste, no odd after taste or fibers or etc. No one Knows the variety, so have begun to call it Kuntes Grande Verdi. It has a anise smell to the leaves, ripens in Fremont in the winter, not sure when it would ripen here in the Central Valley.

I collect them, to keep them going and alive. I have one seedling, not sure of the taste, but one of our CRFG members says is great, He gave me some wood, and good thing, the original tree is now gone, when a new owner bought it.

David
Sunset zone 14, USDA zone 9b

Re: Bonny doon and parrish avocado

Postby manfred » Tue Jul 03, 2012 12:01 am

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Avocados seem to be different from say apples in that the success rate
of growing a good tree from a seed is much higher

Yes - we need to collect more of these local varieties and organize big green scion exchanges

Re: Bonny doon and parrish avocado

Postby nullzero » Tue Jul 03, 2012 12:22 pm

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Rancho Sisquoc Winery on the Foxen Canyon Wine Trail (east of Santa Maria) had about 5 old mature avocado trees all I believe were grown from seeds. No idea on the quality of the fruit, though I did see various fruits @ different stages of development. Took some pictures of them, did not ask the winery staff about the avocado quality.


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