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A forum for growing fruits and rare tropical and temperate fruits, and tending our orchards

First Batch of Nanking Cherry?

Postby tsaephan » Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:20 am

tsaephan
 
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Location: Sacramento, CA
Climate Zone: USDA zone 9
It looks like I might be getting my first crop of nanking cherry! I transplanted these last year, had to do a lot of pruning on them, wasn't sure if they were going to make it but they did and this year after blossoming it looks like fruits might be setting.

I have two small/short (pruned) nanking cherry planted right next to each other for pollination. I have never had nanking cherry before, so I'm looking forward to it. Anyone else have some of these? How does the fruit taste?

nanking.jpg
nanking.jpg (1.2 MiB) Viewed 516 times

Re: First Batch of Nanking Cherry?

Postby MARLONLARA » Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:30 am

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Location: Hercules, California, USA
Climate Zone: 8B
I have use to have two Nanking Cherry plants but the other one died and the remaining one is thriving well but not fruiting because it needs a pollinator.

Re: First Batch of Nanking Cherry?

Postby tsaephan » Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:35 am

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Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Aug 27, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: Sacramento, CA
Climate Zone: USDA zone 9
I'm wondering, would any other cherry pollinate these? I've been curious, if you were to graft a scion wood of one tree onto a different tree, would that one tree be able to pollinate itself?

Re: First Batch of Nanking Cherry?

Postby MARLONLARA » Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:40 am

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Location: Hercules, California, USA
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I have a bing cherry near it but this will not pollinate the bush type nanking cherry. Do you know how to reproduce my cropping or by marcotting? I'd like to have another plant to pollinate mine and taste the fruit for the first time.

Re: First Batch of Nanking Cherry?

Postby tsaephan » Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:51 am

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Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Aug 27, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: Sacramento, CA
Climate Zone: USDA zone 9
It's possible to root a cutting. I don't know how long it would take to produce flowers/fruits though. I can try rooting a few from mine over the fall or try germinating the seeds of the fruits I hope to get and if it works I'll give you one. I'm not far from Hercules, CA.

Re: First Batch of Nanking Cherry?

Postby MARLONLARA » Mon Mar 25, 2013 11:07 am

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Location: Hercules, California, USA
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Thank you. My remaining nanking bush is really nice and looks stunning because of it abundant bloom. Little White flowers with a few streak of pink colors...What I heard is that they are a little bit tart but on the sweeter side excellent eating straight from the bush.

Re: First Batch of Nanking Cherry?

Postby tsaephan » Mon Mar 25, 2013 1:11 pm

tsaephan
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Aug 27, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: Sacramento, CA
Climate Zone: USDA zone 9
Ouuu, I don't mind a little bit of tart. Can't wait! My flowers were the same way, white with a hint of pink. My two trees are not very tall because I pruned them when I transplanted them, they are only about 3-4 ft tall right now.

Re: First Batch of Nanking Cherry?

Postby Ashok » Mon Mar 25, 2013 6:39 pm

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Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 14, USDA Zone 9b
The fruit are on the tart side (although this will vary by clone, of course), but some people enjoy them. They are also small, and the pit/flesh ratio is not the best, so I would say that the species is a bit of a collector's item in California. (As one could use the space to grow, say, a prime peach, or a great mandarin orange, etc.)

They can be propagated by cuttings, even greenwood cuttings, but it is said that cutting-propagated plants will lack a tap root and therefore be less drought-tolerant than plants growing on a seed-initiated root system.

Grafting a piece of a different clone onto an isolated plant should solve the pollination problem, but, as Marlonlara says, Prunus avium cherries probably are not going to work as a pollinizer. (Too distantly related.)

The horrible, horrible Drosophila suzukii fruit flies may attack the crop (I'm not sure about it, but I bet that they would) so it might be best to net the bushes to prevent them from getting in.


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