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A forum for growing rare fruits, edibles and Permaculture with a focus on tropicals.

Re: Guide to growing Avocados in a cool (not cold) climate

Postby wbutler » Thu Dec 30, 2010 5:19 pm

wbutler
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 9:53 am
Climate Zone: zone 9
Hi Folks

Anyone know where to get a Daily 11 variety besides brokaw ?


William Visalia Ca

Re: Guide to growing Avocados in a cool (not cold) climate

Postby SJVcharlie » Thu Dec 30, 2010 8:09 pm

SJVcharlie
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Dec 19, 2010 8:15 pm
Climate Zone: 9
Jeff/Dave
I quickly read your posts. I'll analyze Saturday and get back to you. I do a farmers market in the Bay area Friday Heading to bed now for early wake-up and trip from valley.
Cheers, Charlie

Re: Guide to growing Avocados in a cool (not cold) climate

Postby pepa » Sat Jan 01, 2011 4:03 am

pepa
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2010 4:50 am
Climate Zone: n/a
I must say I agree about Ettinger being a good pollinator. Mine was the first to flower for me this year and I have had Gwen, Rincon and Bacon all flower after it and finish while my Ettinger just keeps on going. It must have been flowering for well over 2 months now. I Have had a bad year with fruit set because it has been such a strange wet cold season in South Eastern Australia but I am hoping to have a few set with the conditions finally warming up a little.
Sean

Re: Guide to growing Avocados in a cool (not cold) climate

Postby MarkN » Sat Jan 01, 2011 6:53 am

MarkN
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Wed Dec 08, 2010 9:08 am
Location: Central Texas, zone 8b
Climate Zone: USDA zone 8b
First post and I must say, what a great site!

FWIW, I've got Sharwil, Holiday, Sir Prize and Pinkerton on Mexican seedling rootstock (bummer). As soon as I can make up my feeble mind they will be planted in raised beds either in a cold frame type house or a Gothic Arch greenhouse with corrogated roof panels and side curtains that I can raise for bee pollination in the spring. Have also grafted citrus budwood to Flying Dragon rootstock. Some are producing very well, others were just grafted.

Regards,
Mark
Central Texas (north of Fredericksburg)

Re: Guide to growing Avocados in a cool (not cold) climate

Postby Jason_AU » Sat Jan 01, 2011 7:07 am

Jason_AU
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 190
Joined: Thu Nov 25, 2010 11:21 pm
Location: 38 deg South 141 deg East
Climate Zone: USDA Zone 9
Hey Mark, how warm does it get in Spring there in Texas?. I was there in late Summer once and it was HOOOOOT, the sunlight itself was very mild and you could go outside without a hat etc. it just wasn't burning with power like it is in Southern Australia but still as far as I can remember it was near or above 40c everyday. So it seemed good conditions for growing things that want lots of heat. But then I came back to Texas in October? as Christmas approached it got really cold..... really fast. Then I could see the problem :). Wouldn't you want some varieties that can handle cold temps down in the low 20's(F) at least? there are varieties like that, in fact Ettinger is one of them, but only any good if you get the heat in Spring. In fact a Mexican rootstock sounds fine for such a place to me as I have a Mexican wife I'm reminded almost daily that Texas is a temporarily borrowed state lol (I'm making her words more mild) .

I know David has collected? or at least is in contact with and attempted to collected scions from very cold hardly seedlings inside Texas so he is the man to talk to about cold proof Avocados for Texas.

Sean I got pretty good fruit set on my second smaller Ettinger tree this year, well considering my all time record on the big tree is one fruit!:P I have maybe 20 on the smaller one this year, I'm not sure exactly why but you can probably put it down to the tree simply being more healthy with more fertiliser and more water since it hasn't been warmer than usual (been cooler really). I'll see what I can get out of it next year. It might be a semi winner production wise in the end as well as a good fruit and good pollinator

Re: Guide to growing Avocados in a cool (not cold) climate

Postby MarkN » Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:56 pm

MarkN
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Wed Dec 08, 2010 9:08 am
Location: Central Texas, zone 8b
Climate Zone: USDA zone 8b
Hi Jason,

The very cold hardy varieties you speak of were gleaned from areas around Uvalde, Del Rio, and the San Antonio area that usually don't dip below the mid teens (F). Such varietals are pure Mexican - Pryor, Fantastic, Wilma, Joey, Brazos Belle. I'm not interested in outdoors planting nor those varieties as their flavor and quality don't match up to other selections, or so I'm told. My Guatemalan or hybrid MXG trees will have heat in the winter under "glass" and won't be subject to temps below freezing.

I don't think the Sharwil or Holiday will present a problem keeping them under 12' in height in a gothic arch, high tunnel house. The Pinkerton and Sir Prize might.

We had a low of 7F/-20C last year. Even folks far south of me will eventually see an Arctic freeze take out their beloved "cold" hardy stock......some day, some time.

Tell your wife that the latinos have succeeded in taking back Texas without firing a shot. I'll leave it at that. :cry:

Mark

Re: Guide to growing Avocados in a cool (not cold) climate

Postby SJVcharlie » Sun Jan 02, 2011 11:16 pm

SJVcharlie
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Dec 19, 2010 8:15 pm
Climate Zone: 9
David
I said the Holiday was reported to be promising in the Central Valley trial, except for dropping fruit not drooping.
I should have said the 'Harvest' variety.. Those were comments by M.L Arpia, UC researcher testing varieties in the Porterville, Ca area. 'Harvest' thrived in the summer heat but the fruit began falling off the tree when the temps started cooling in late fall. She stated that the only tree to have bloom after the last bad freeze was the GEM variety. When we have bad freezes, every 7-10 years it seems, we loose the fruiting wood for the next season.

I should join the local rare fruit group. I have been to several tastings at Lindcove this year, but probably will not go on the 15th.

Charlie

Re: Guide to growing Avocados in a cool (not cold) climate

Postby DavidLJ48 » Mon Jan 03, 2011 10:16 am

DavidLJ48
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 2285
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 8:38 pm
Location: San Joaquin Valley, CA
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 14, USDA zone 9b
Charlie

Sorry for the misunderstanding, must of been my dyslexia and ADD of sorts, that has worsened since my military days decades ago. Thanks for correcting me.

I have noticed, talking to others here in this area, that even lows down into the mid 20s, can exacerbate fruit drop too. Last year, in Dec, I had 25F low, surrounding areas more near 22 to 23F. Even the Bacon and other late Mexican types, seemed to make a much quicker drop after it hit, they drop pretty fast, all of them, not staggered over a couple months or more, as is usual.

Are you saying there is more then one variety of Holiday ? If so, how many are there and are some more cold hardy, if one is more heat hardy ?David
Sunset zone 14, USDA zone 9b

Re: Guide to growing Avocados in a cool (not cold) climate

Postby Kern » Mon Jan 03, 2011 4:52 pm

Kern
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:44 am
Location: Newman, Ca.
Climate Zone: USDA 9b
He is saying Harvest is a variety. Holiday and Harvest not nearly the same. Not closely related. Holiday is a much larger fruit than Hass, and a smaller tree. See link on Harvest, and then search "Holiday avocado".

http://brokawnursery.com/

Kern in Newman, Ca.

Re: Guide to growing Avocados in a cool (not cold) climate

Postby DavidLJ48 » Tue Jan 04, 2011 11:31 am

DavidLJ48
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 2285
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 8:38 pm
Location: San Joaquin Valley, CA
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 14, USDA zone 9b
Ok, I finally got it, thanks. My mind reads things into things that are not there, unless plainly and precisely expressed. If you think it is maddening, just think of what my wife has to deal with. Though she has gotten used to it and has learned. Our daughter is wired the way I am, so fully understands me and I her.

David
Sunset zone 14, USDA zone 9b

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