If you like this topic, then share it or bookmark it:
  • delicious
  • digg
  • facebook
  • myspace
  • reddit
  • stumble
  • twitter
  • rss
  • bookmark
  • email


A forum for growing rare fruits, edibles and Permaculture with a focus on tropicals.

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby John S » Thu Jun 30, 2011 9:08 pm

User avatar
John S
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 268
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 10:19 pm
Climate Zone: USDA8
Twan,
I would try first with just removing the citrus waste, unless it is like 40% of the total compost. Remember, upside down citrus halves are a great haven for slugs, and there fore a great way for us to find them and kill them.
John S
PDX OR

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby Unkledon » Mon Nov 07, 2011 6:02 pm

Unkledon
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 8:54 am
Location: Corralitos, Santa Cruz, CA; USDA 9b
Climate Zone: Sunset 17
I live in Aptos, which is between the Santa Cruz Mountains and the coast. I started permaculture/homesteading 35 years ago on my three acres but then I got caught up in my career (teacher/principal) and neglected my place. I retired a couple years ago and am back full time with my orchard, small garden, and animals.

In my orchard I have most fruits that do well here: apples, pears, asian pears, plums, prunes, mulberry, peaches, nectarines, two kinds of guavas, blackberries, blueberries, hachiya persimmon, chestnuts, one walnut tree, grapes, a pomegranite, oranges, lemon, loquat, tangelo, avocados, and several of the Zaiger plum/apricot crosses, About half are under five years old. I have also planted but had troubles with figs (never seem to ripen), filberts, cherries (never set fruit), and back in the day I tried cherimoyas, pitayas, and other exotic fruit which didn't do well here without special treatment which I didn't have time for then. My goal is to harvest food all year round. I just got an Easter Buerre (sp.?) at the CRFG pear tasting, and it is supposed to ripen in December and keep until February. I also have a big garden filled with asparagus.

To produce the manure to fertilize the trees I have chickens, rabbits and two sheep ewes, which give me lambs every year for the freezer. They mow the lawn and I'm working on ways they can mow the orchards without nibbling on the semidwarf trees. (So far, the rotten-egg deer repellent seems to work best, not the pepper based spray.)

I enjoy reading everyone's comments.

Thanks!

Don Eggleston

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby Twan » Mon Nov 07, 2011 8:38 pm

Twan
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 1:50 pm
Location: Chula Vista, San Diego CA
Climate Zone: 10
Wow, it seems you changed "gear" back from being a teacher to a "farmer" so quickly and so well. I really admire you for that. Wonderful to read what you have on your land. Three acres is a lot of land. It might have been the weather that the figs don't ripe, cherimoya, and pitaya don't do well. But you have plenty of other plants, trees that produce, so that's what counts. Congratulations! Thanks for sharing your story with us.

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby Unkledon » Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:13 am

Unkledon
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 8:54 am
Location: Corralitos, Santa Cruz, CA; USDA 9b
Climate Zone: Sunset 17
Couple of questions:

1. Will the new low-chill cherries work in my area?

2. My orchards are on hills, so I don't cultivate, and I'm looking for no-work methods of keeping the soil healthy. Directly around the trunks I have planted legumes and rye, etc., but around the drip lines I have put Russian comfrey. This is supposed to be a good mulch and crowd out other weeds. Seems to be working. Any comments?

Don

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby John S » Thu Nov 10, 2011 6:30 pm

User avatar
John S
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 268
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 10:19 pm
Climate Zone: USDA8
Comfrey is a great nutrient accumulator. One can make lots of cuttings of the plant as mulch. Easy to grow. I am very pro that plant. Also wilted comfrey is apparently good animal feed.
John S
PDX OR

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby Unkledon » Sat Nov 12, 2011 9:03 am

Unkledon
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 8:54 am
Location: Corralitos, Santa Cruz, CA; USDA 9b
Climate Zone: Sunset 17
Thanks!

Don

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby HayesValleyFarmer » Sat Mar 03, 2012 4:34 pm

HayesValleyFarmer
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2010 3:24 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset 17/USDA 9b-10
As my name suggests i worked/ now volunteer at a 2 arce farm in the middle of San Francisco. Its permaculture based and we don't use plots we simply go about doing the whole site. I probably am the best person to talk to because I have reduced my time going there but over all its a beautiful site that has people showing up and learning (We were even in Sunset Magazine!).

Plant list:
Kale
Lettuce
Nastursium
Arugula
Choko/Mirliton
Scarlet Runner Bean
Peas
Zambo Squash
Pepino
Oca
Golden berry
Corn

Probably a lot more I missed but those are what come up first :D

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby edris » Tue May 29, 2012 10:04 am

edris
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 9:32 am
Location: San Francisco, CA
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 17, USDA Zone 10a
I am a new Cloudforest member. I spent the last 4 years on a Bay Area hiatus in Indiana where I had the opportunity to gather fresh water from a spring. That jumpstarted the homesteader in me and since returning to the Bay Area (running in flames from red state attitutdes!) I have found a place to live that has space for gardening. I am not YET a homesteader but am on my way. It is part of my political activism. I have a very limited budget having traded my stressful job in Indian for poverty, LOL, but every extra cent I get goes to seeds, transplants and containers so hopefully I will be sustainable very soon. I am looking forward to the assistance and inspiration of the participants of this forum. :D

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby Dan in S. TX » Wed Jul 04, 2012 2:59 pm

Dan in S. TX
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2012 3:14 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 28, USDA zone 9
John - Your discussion of poke weed interested me. We had a "volunteer" poke weed show up in our back yard a few years ago. I didn't know what it was initially but saw a picture at some point and recognized it. I gave it some water when it drooped and otherwise left it alone. Every year since we have had more plants come up. The birds love the berries and their digestive systems are the perfect chemistry ro germinate the seeds. We probably have 20 plants scattered around the yard now.
One of my neighbors is of a similar mindset and was fascinated when poke weed showed up in her yard this year!

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby ellen in berkeley » Wed Jul 04, 2012 3:17 pm

ellen in berkeley
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 212
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 11:00 am
Location: berkeley near downtown
Climate Zone: sunset 17, ecoregion 11.1.1
The interwebs are good at echoing things. Most of the warnings regarding poke come from a few sources, and are not by people who eat the stuff.

The JL Hudson catalog says:
PHYTOLACCACEAE. About 25 species ranging from herbs to trees. Grown for ornament, food and medicine. Easily grown in most soils. Seed long-lived (40 years or more), and may germinate readily; some need cold treatment. An interesting and often bizarre genus, one species was alleged to generate a strong electric charge. The young shoots of several are eaten, though mature leaves and roots are poisonous. Previous recommendations of boiling in 2 waters were overcautious- P. americana has been grown as a commercial vegetable near Philadelphia for 200 years. As one fellow wrote- "Anyone who says you should boil poke should be required to boil their asparagus!"

Still, it's easy to be scared by the sort of stuff one reads, so I would prefer to get introduced to eating poke sallet, like many wild foodstuffs, by someone who has done it a while. Especially since its growth habit is different here in the west than on its home ground.

One thing that is quite interesting to me about poke is that I don't recall seeing it here in the Bay Area before ten or maybe fifteen years ago. It seems to be spreading fast, popping up all over lately. Anyone else notice this, or was I simply not aware of it until a few years ago?

PreviousNext

Return to Rare Fruits, Edibles and Permaculture with a focus on tropicals

Welcome Guest

Please register or login if you would like to post. It is currently Sat Oct 21, 2017 10:31 am. (All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]).

Getting Around the Cafe

Login