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A forum for growing rare fruits, edibles and Permaculture with a focus on tropicals.

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby Dan in S. TX » Mon Jul 09, 2012 2:14 pm

Dan in S. TX
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2012 3:14 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 28, USDA zone 9
Hi Ellen,
My Grandmother was very fond of poke salat. She was born in the 1880's in central Texas and grew up eating it. My Uncle told me that she would send her boys out to gather it in the early spring. Apparently back then (1930ish) they boiled it in two changes of water. They thought this was necessary back then. It may not be.
I haven't eaten any because I have been letting it get established.
My Uncle said they had some success at planting it via seed but I don't think the germination rate was acceptable. I tried to transplant one that came up in a pot with a citrus and it withered.

Dan

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby MrsMorningSong » Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:07 am

User avatar
MrsMorningSong
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 5:00 am
Location: Fort Myers, Florida
Climate Zone: 10A
I have begun urban homesteading in the last few years. With food prices souring, and the introduction of GMO's into the food sources, we find it imperable to do this.
Currently have apples, peach, mango, loquats, blackberries, moringa, blueberries, and some others too much to list.
Love growing my own tea garden. It includes hibiscus, camelia, ginger root, passiflora, lemongrass.
Also grow heirloom cherry tomatoes every winter. Here we have too big of a bug issue to grow a larger garden, I tried it and between the grasshoppers and squirrels, cucumber beetles, I had to resort to an enclosed screenhouse as my growing space. It is much smaller than the bed garden was, only 16 ft. x 12, so tomatoes, salad greens, mesclun and peas get a go come cooler temps.
Summers I grow out my brugmansia for sale in same screenhouse.
I wold like to get into chickens, but we are going to have to wait on this until next spring. Getting off the grid is also important to us, and in the future we would love to go solar for a cleaner power source.
Notice many of you are Californians. Florida is not near as green as you, sadly.
I'm originally from Antelope Valley, Lancaster to be exact, so was brought up green thinking. Wish more people would go this direction, but hope springs eternal.
Since I am relatively new to this, I do a lot of reading and will be 'listening' to all advice offered here.

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby Oakspring » Wed Jun 26, 2013 10:46 pm

Oakspring
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Jun 26, 2013 12:04 am
Location: So. California
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 23, USDA zone 10A
New "wannabee" urban/suburban homesteader here. I began organically gardening as a kid in the seventies after reading every issue of Organic Gardening and Farming I could get my hands on. That was back when the Rodale brothers were at the helm. Since that time, off and on, through several careers and too many moves, whenever I could I've grown what i could, where I could. Now that I'm retired full time (which is a lot more work than I first thought) I can focus on creating an Organic, Permaculture based, postage stamp sized Suburban Homestead here in perhaps one of the best growing zones on the planet.

We recently moved back to Southern California to care for my wife's elderly parents and moved into her Grandmother's mid-century ranch style home. The landscape has been sadly ignored through decades of renters and now we're in the process of restoring the house and it's suburban landscape.

We have a thirty foot half dead Olive tree that in the past produced loads of olives. I'm hoping to make our own Olive Oil. We saved a three foot Avocado tree that had been sadly neglected. There's a Grapefruit tree that grew through the bottom of its pot. There's some sort of dwarf Palm tree that produces dates. Now whether they are edible or not I have no idea. We also have a hedge of Natal Plum. I have no idea what its fruit will taste like. Didn't even know it flowered or had fruit when we first got here.

Our goal is to save what we are able to and introduce as much as we can towards our goal of creating a totally edible landscape; from low-chill Apples, Peaches and other fruits to Bananas, Dates and everything in between. If I can grow it - I'm going to try to integrate it into our food support system here. So expect LOTS of silly questions, curious thoughts and just plain weird ideas.....so please be patient with me and I hope that I can also add something to the mix for others.

THANK YOU.

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby Jimmyjam » Sun Aug 25, 2013 2:26 pm

User avatar
Jimmyjam
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Aug 19, 2013 5:25 am
Location: Murrieta, Ca
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 18, USDA zone 9b
I've joined the urban homestead movement since buying my home one year ago today. However, my fruiting efforts are nil as of yet. My grafted citrus is bearing some limes, but my 4 in 1 apple produces nothing but blooms yet, and my 3 in 1 cherry doesn't seem to like the heat here. The apple and cherry are 3-5 ft 'saplings' at best, so i'm sure I just need to be patient. My veggie garden reaped tons of zucchini, squash, and japanese cukes, and I've been getting lots of cayenne, habanero, pepperocini, and fresno chiles. My tomatoes have been an utter disappointment. 3 roma plants and 7 better boys, all the plants reached massive height/size, and tons of green tomatoes have formed, but I've had issues with them dying on the vine without even beginning to ripen. I'm new to the climate here, and I had concerns as to what would work in this apparently barren soil that I have amended by 60% with topsoil, compost, and manure. My fall plans are to build full on planter boxes, with a shade structure and sail that can be easily installed or rolled back dependent on the season and plants' needs. I too am not zoned for livestock, so can't explore the goat and chicken options, but as Axel said, every bit helps, and I'd like to get to the point of partial self sustainment. I've been canning my own pickles, peppers, and even made my first round of homemade cayenne/habanero hot sauce. It came out rather delicious!

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby RodneyS » Wed Oct 02, 2013 3:09 pm

User avatar
RodneyS
Cloudforest Guru
 
Posts: 549
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 6:41 am
Location: Cerritos, CA
Climate Zone: USDA Zone 11a
Jimmyjam wrote:I've joined the urban homestead movement since buying my home one year ago today. However, my fruiting efforts are nil as of yet. My grafted citrus is bearing some limes, but my 4 in 1 apple produces nothing but blooms yet, and my 3 in 1 cherry doesn't seem to like the heat here. The apple and cherry are 3-5 ft 'saplings' at best, so i'm sure I just need to be patient. My veggie garden reaped tons of zucchini, squash, and japanese cukes, and I've been getting lots of cayenne, habanero, pepperocini, and fresno chiles. My tomatoes have been an utter disappointment. 3 roma plants and 7 better boys, all the plants reached massive height/size, and tons of green tomatoes have formed, but I've had issues with them dying on the vine without even beginning to ripen. I'm new to the climate here, and I had concerns as to what would work in this apparently barren soil that I have amended by 60% with topsoil, compost, and manure. My fall plans are to build full on planter boxes, with a shade structure and sail that can be easily installed or rolled back dependent on the season and plants' needs. I too am not zoned for livestock, so can't explore the goat and chicken options, but as Axel said, every bit helps, and I'd like to get to the point of partial self sustainment. I've been canning my own pickles, peppers, and even made my first round of homemade cayenne/habanero hot sauce. It came out rather delicious!


You may want to look into tilapia aquaponics for a protein source/growing system.

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby konan99 » Mon Dec 08, 2014 12:01 am

konan99
 
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2014 11:59 am
Location: Cupertino, CA
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 15
Something for you homesteaders... we are not quite there yet although we are getting close :-)

An electronic soil maker/compost maker! I was introduced to it recently from a group that is looking to group buy the machine. There is a video showing how it works. Interesting little gadget I must say.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a ... 1MG0E71110

Re: Roll Call for Urban Homesteaders

Postby SeattleBen » Wed Jun 24, 2015 2:45 pm

SeattleBen
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 10:55 am
Climate Zone: 8B
I've started to convert my Renton, WA home 2 yrs ago in to a bit of an urban farm.

Here's my blog on my garden adventures.
http://seattlegardenfruit.blogspot.com/

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