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A forum for growing rare fruits, edibles and Permaculture with a focus on tropicals.

Re: That Myrica rubra stuff from a few years back

Postby yeti17 » Fri Apr 17, 2015 12:20 am

yeti17
 
Posts: 85
Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2014 11:53 pm
Climate Zone: USDA 10A
DavidLJ48 wrote:mine looked great for a time, then showed leaf yellowing, then leaf burning, like a plant in s high pH soil or way too acid or heavy soil salts; , appeared to be potting soil problems; too much organic matter, and or pH or ??????


David, how is your one remaining plant doing?

Regarding pH, I found the following:

"Red bayberry is adapted to acidic soils (pH 4-5). Plants usually grow in groves at the foot to partway up hills. They share a niche with fern, rhododendron, pine and China fir. Green tea, stone fruit (eg. peaches) and citrus are cropped in the same areas. A nitrogen-fixing bacterial (Actinomyces frankia) association produces nodules on the root system and facilitates growth in infertile hill soils versus on fertile flat lands."

https://rirdc.infoservices.com.au/downloads/05-081

Re: That Myrica rubra stuff from a few years back

Postby DavidLJ48 » Sat Apr 18, 2015 2:05 pm

DavidLJ48
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 2285
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 8:38 pm
Location: San Joaquin Valley, CA
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 14, USDA zone 9b
You have found more out then I have, as far as soil, in fact I have never seen a report like yours; from others involved with the crfg orders and research; plant requirements info has been scarce, but demand maybe causing more to surface.

This is worth emailing to the others I know. I don't know about peaches liking a 4-5 pH, where I live here, this is peach and almond country. I have never seen soil acid needs this low before.

I grew my seeds and plants in more acid peat moss potting soil, May best remaining plant, has now lost is bright green new season leaves, for more yellowish ones, now that growth has slowed, and it has warmed mored more. Yunfei who was part of the ordering team, from the 2 China orders of grafted trees; found her seedlings do best in Bay Area native soil, where he lives.

David


yeti17 wrote:
DavidLJ48 wrote:mine looked great for a time, then showed leaf yellowing, then leaf burning, like a plant in s high pH soil or way too acid or heavy soil salts; , appeared to be potting soil problems; too much organic matter, and or pH or ??????


David, how is your one remaining plant doing?

Regarding pH, I found the following:

"Red bayberry is adapted to acidic soils (pH 4-5). Plants usually grow in groves at the foot to partway up hills. They share a niche with fern, rhododendron, pine and China fir. Green tea, stone fruit (eg. peaches) and citrus are cropped in the same areas. A nitrogen-fixing bacterial (Actinomyces frankia) association produces nodules on the root system and facilitates growth in infertile hill soils versus on fertile flat lands."

https://rirdc.infoservices.com.au/downloads/05-081
Sunset zone 14, USDA zone 9b

Re: That Myrica rubra stuff from a few years back

Postby DavidLJ48 » Sat Apr 18, 2015 2:26 pm

DavidLJ48
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 2285
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 8:38 pm
Location: San Joaquin Valley, CA
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 14, USDA zone 9b
More acid soil requirement, sure would explain their suffering yellowing green veined leaves, death, just like most of my Miracle Fruit seedlings, which I started from seed, which where started and grown in a 4 pH plus peat soil, and had similar results; unless the bale of peat was not acid like it should have been, or had something else wrong about it; use acid water on them.

My American bayberry rootstock has no soil problems here, but almost all of my first time grafts, did not take this spring.

David


DavidLJ48 wrote:You have found more out then I have, as far as soil, in fact I have never seen a report like yours; from others involved with the crag orders and research; plant requirements info has been scarce, but demand maybe causing more to surface.

This is worth emailing to the others I know. I don't know about peaches liking a 4-5 pH, where I live here, this is peach and almond country. I have never seen soil acid needs this low before.

I grew my seeds and plants in more acid peat moss potting soil, May best remaining plant, has now lost is bright green new season leaves, for more yellowish ones, now that growth has slowed, and it has warmed mored more. Yunfei who was part of the ordering team, from the 2 China orders of grafted trees; found her seedlings do best in Bay Area native soil, where he lives.

David


yeti17 wrote:
DavidLJ48 wrote:mine looked great for a time, then showed leaf yellowing, then leaf burning, like a plant in s high pH soil or way too acid or heavy soil salts; , appeared to be potting soil problems; too much organic matter, and or pH or ??????


David, how is your one remaining plant doing?

Regarding pH, I found the following:

"Red bayberry is adapted to acidic soils (pH 4-5). Plants usually grow in groves at the foot to partway up hills. They share a niche with fern, rhododendron, pine and China fir. Green tea, stone fruit (eg. peaches) and citrus are cropped in the same areas. A nitrogen-fixing bacterial (Actinomyces frankia) association produces nodules on the root system and facilitates growth in infertile hill soils versus on fertile flat lands."

https://rirdc.infoservices.com.au/downloads/05-081
Sunset zone 14, USDA zone 9b

Re: That Myrica rubra stuff from a few years back

Postby DavidLJ48 » Sun Apr 19, 2015 4:05 pm

DavidLJ48
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 2285
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 8:38 pm
Location: San Joaquin Valley, CA
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 14, USDA zone 9b
I emailed Yunfei, he said 4.5 to 5 plus does not sound right, maybe they can handle down to that. He takes trips to China, and his under standing is, around 5.5 to like 6 plus is prime soil pH, but can do well in higher, which is more stone fruit and citrus soils. Though you sou would like both views.



david
Sunset zone 14, USDA zone 9b

Re: That Myrica rubra stuff from a few years back

Postby sokoo » Thu Jan 07, 2016 10:48 pm

sokoo
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2011 10:35 am
Location: Bay area
Climate Zone: USDA Zone 9b
My yangmei (Myrica rubra, or Morella rubra) trees grow very well on the near-neutral Bay area soil. Soil pH was around 7, but I have been adding leaves and pine straws so the pH of the top layer is lower now, maybe close to 6. Anyway, yangmei prefers an acidic soil, maybe around pH5.5 to 6, but can tolerate pH4 to maybe as high as 8. There was a report showing early fruiting of yangmei on pH8 soil, but the trees did not seem very healthy.
Mine fruited for the first time last year, late May to late June. That's only 4 years after my seedlings broke ground. Fruits were all from elite varieties grafted to the seedlings, but the seedlings themselves produced male flowers too. The fruits were very tasty, although some were on the small side, probably because it's the first year, and because of the drought.
I am hoping a nursery or orchard would be interested in partnering with me to produce the plants and/or fruits, to make them available to more people. This is definitely a wonderful fruit.

Re: That Myrica rubra stuff from a few years back

Postby yeti17 » Fri Jan 08, 2016 12:10 am

yeti17
 
Posts: 85
Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2014 11:53 pm
Climate Zone: USDA 10A
Glad this thread is still alive, and glad there's someone here who is successfully growing M rubra. My lone seedling is still alive, but still pretty small- hopefully it will put on a lot of new growth this season.

Re: That Myrica rubra stuff from a few years back

Postby DavidLJ48 » Fri Jan 08, 2016 7:44 pm

DavidLJ48
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 2285
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 8:38 pm
Location: San Joaquin Valley, CA
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 14, USDA zone 9b
yeti17 wrote:Glad this thread is still alive, and glad there's someone here who is successfully growing M rubra. My lone seedling is still alive, but still pretty small, hopefully it will put on a lot of new growth this season.


I have lost all of my seedlings, most died less then 3 inches tall, within the first year, one did grow somewhat better, lasted a couple years or more, died early last summer.
It must be some kind of soil requirement we are not meeting, one person I know, on the coast, planted seeds into the ground, they did ok, but not sure what kind of soil he had.

It is odd, it is not supposed to need too special of soil, just not one too high in Potassium i think, if my memory is not too far off.

I have scion wood last season to graft onto an American strain of Myrica, but only one graft took, a seedling male from the sender. But all of those who got scion wood last season, had similar negative results. We are set to get more wood this season, much earlier, hoping this will help graft take.

David
Sunset zone 14, USDA zone 9b

Re: That Myrica rubra stuff from a few years back

Postby sokoo » Tue Feb 16, 2016 11:38 am

sokoo
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2011 10:35 am
Location: Bay area
Climate Zone: USDA Zone 9b
My trees are flowering again. Dense flowers for both male and female.
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Re: That Myrica rubra stuff from a few years back

Postby So_Cal_Mike » Tue Feb 16, 2016 12:18 pm

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Those look nice and healthy. Looking forward to updates as the fruit matures.

I wonder if you could graft a male branch onto the female (and vice versa) for pollination purposes. I did that with a carob tree, and the flowers remained distinct.
Sunset Zone: 21 • USDA Zone: 10a • AHS Heat Zone: 6-7

Re: That Myrica rubra stuff from a few years back

Postby sokoo » Tue Feb 16, 2016 12:32 pm

sokoo
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2011 10:35 am
Location: Bay area
Climate Zone: USDA Zone 9b
So_Cal_Mike wrote:I wonder if you could graft a male branch onto the female (and vice versa) for pollination purposes.


Sure you can. I did that 2 years ago. This year I got flowers from it.

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