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A forum for growing rare fruits, edibles and Permaculture with a focus on tropicals.

Re: What's the fastest growing inland-hardy avocado cultivar

Postby TucsonKen » Mon Oct 10, 2016 8:29 am

TucsonKen
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2011 12:41 pm
Location: Tucson, AZ
Climate Zone: USDA zone 8b, almost 9a
2016-10-09 Wilma_7836 rdc.jpg
Nearly mature fruit 9 Sep 2016
2016-10-09 Wilma_7836 rdc.jpg (80.36 KiB) Viewed 3798 times

If you want fast growth, try a 'Wilma.' I have one purchased as a 1-gallon in 2012 from Devine Avocados in Devine, Texas. Unfortunately, the owner, Bill Schneider, doesn't ship trees out of state, so purchases must be made on-site (he might ship scion wood, however). I planted it in my yard in Tucson in the spring of 2013 and it hit a gangly eight feet tall that same season. In 2015 it hit 16 feet, spread out and got bushy, and produced its first 14 fruit. This spring I topped it back to about 12 feet, but it has rebounded higher than before pruning and is currently loaded with mature fruit.

I cannot verify the nursery's claims that it is hardy to 16 degrees, but so far it has been largely unfazed by our winter lows, with damage limited to blackening of the newest, tender foliage, and loss of blossoms that were open during freezing temps (it bloomed over a long enough period that there was still plenty of fruit set).

When fully ripe, the edible skin is shiny, black, and thin as the skin of a tomato. Having black chunks of skin in your guacamole can be a little off-putting at first, but it tastes fine. The difficult part for me has been determining when the fruit is truly ready to pick--I tend to jump the gun and then they shrivel and get rubbery rather than ripening. The best ones so far are a couple that have fallen to the ground unnoticed, which I only found after they had been chewed by packrats. I trimmed off the nasty parts and the rest was creamy and flavorful. This year, I'm having better luck waiting until they're ready.
Attachments
2016-10-09 Wilma tree_7844 rdc.jpg
4 year-old Wilma Avocado in Tucson, AZ
2016-10-09 Wilma tree_7844 rdc.jpg (142.35 KiB) Viewed 3798 times

Re: What's the fastest growing inland-hardy avocado cultivar

Postby jearl » Sun Oct 16, 2016 8:58 am

jearl
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:13 am
Climate Zone: usda zone 9
I have just started collecting budwood of unusual Cv's.

Right now I have Wilma, Aravipa, Mex grande, Queen, Bacon and a number of nonamer seedlings found locally that I am evaluating.

Based on the Pic above wilma looks a lot like Mex grande.

Jeff

Re: What's the fastest growing inland-hardy avocado cultivar

Postby TucsonKen » Tue Oct 18, 2016 7:24 pm

TucsonKen
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2011 12:41 pm
Location: Tucson, AZ
Climate Zone: USDA zone 8b, almost 9a
I haven't seen a ripe Mexicola Grande, but when fully ripe, Wilmas are black and shiny.
Attachments
2016-10-18 Wilma fruit uncut, small.jpg
2016-10-18 Wilma fruit uncut, small.jpg (57.66 KiB) Viewed 3628 times

Re: What's the fastest growing inland-hardy avocado cultivar

Postby RobertS » Wed Oct 19, 2016 9:38 am

RobertS
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 703
Joined: Thu Nov 25, 2010 10:55 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 17
Ken, that's a nice looking Wilma, they are much longer in appearance that Mexicola Grande. How's the taste? didn't like my M. Grande at first but now I love them plus you can eat the skin on Mexican varieties.

Re: What's the fastest growing inland-hardy avocado cultivar

Postby TucsonKen » Wed Oct 19, 2016 4:33 pm

TucsonKen
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2011 12:41 pm
Location: Tucson, AZ
Climate Zone: USDA zone 8b, almost 9a
I haven't eaten many yet, but so far I like them a lot. The texture is smooth and creamy, and the skin is so delicate it isn't noticeable. I think the flavor is a bit stronger than what I get in the grocery store. I've also noticed that, at least when kept in the fridge, the cut edges still look fresh the next day--no browning.

I'm pretty new to growing avocados so I can't compare Wilma to any other locally-grown varieties. Hopefully that will change before long, as I have a 3' high in-ground Opal just beginning to bear (a single fruit this year), and a few others I plan to plant in 2017 (a Mexicola Grande grafted last year, a small Aravaipa, and a newly-grafted Little Cado). I also grafted another Wilma to replace my current tree, since I had no idea it would grow so fast, and it's close enough to a block wall that I'm afraid it won't be long before the roots crack it. So, everything but the Opal will go far out in the yard where they can grow big without damaging anything.

Re: What's the fastest growing inland-hardy avocado cultivar

Postby DavidLJ48 » Tue Jan 31, 2017 7:24 pm

DavidLJ48
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 2282
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 8:38 pm
Location: San Joaquin Valley, CA
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 14, USDA zone 9b
Most Mexican hardy avocados can take the Central Valleys warmer areas in winter. I have quite a few varieties not found in nurseries
Sunset zone 14, USDA zone 9b

Re: What's the fastest growing inland-hardy avocado cultivar

Postby DavidLJ48 » Fri May 26, 2017 11:34 am

DavidLJ48
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 2282
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 8:38 pm
Location: San Joaquin Valley, CA
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 14, USDA zone 9b
One of the most fastest I have is what I call Fortado, after the man who owns the tree in Fremont CA; he acquired it from SoCal in the 60s, at a nursery, it seems to be no longer being produced by any nursery. Large 1 pound fruits, green skinned, I have as well one similar that is blacked skinned, from Mexico, also 1 pound fruits.
Sunset zone 14, USDA zone 9b

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