If you like this topic, then share it or bookmark it:
  • delicious
  • digg
  • facebook
  • myspace
  • reddit
  • stumble
  • twitter
  • rss
  • bookmark
  • email


Please welcome new members here and if you have not introduced yourself yet, take a minute to let people know a little bit about yourself.

Aloha Nui

Postby HillsideFarmHawaii » Thu Jan 02, 2014 1:26 pm

User avatar
HillsideFarmHawaii
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 4:09 pm
Climate Zone: USDA zone 11
Aloha Cloudforest Folks,

Just checking in with an "introduction", so "Aloha!" (That translates to "Hi!" for all the non-Hawaiian speakers in the audience, but I'll betcha most of you already know some Hawaiian, huh?)

We're on the Island of Hawaii, also known as "the Big Island" since otherwise we get confused with all those other Hawaiian islands. (Personally, I think calling it "Moku Nui" which is "Big Island" in Hawaiian would solve that problem, but they never ask me.)

We are on a small (quarter acre - which would be huge in Honolulu but is small for the Big Island) residential lot and growing an assortment of edibles and useful plants in the yard. We try to get as much of our vegetables and fruits as possible from the yard, partly for taste, partly for frugality and partly so we will know what's in our food. Our County Mayor did sign a No-GMO bill last year, but that's for things growing, not food in grocery stores, at least, as far as I know. So, growing your own is still the best.

Other than fruits and vegetables, we grow forage for our backyard livestock (chickens & bunnies and maybe silkworms later this year) as well as dye and fiber plants.

A hui hou,
Catz

Image

Re: Aloha Nui

Postby Lorax » Wed Feb 26, 2014 10:01 am

User avatar
Lorax
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 148
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 12:01 pm
Location: Santa Cruz
Climate Zone: Sunset 17
Aloha Catz
Big up the island crew ! Welcome to cloudforest and thanks for posting. What rare fruits are you looking to grow in your garden?

Re: Aloha Nui

Postby RodneyS » Wed Feb 26, 2014 10:42 am

User avatar
RodneyS
Cloudforest Guru
 
Posts: 549
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 6:41 am
Location: Cerritos, CA
Climate Zone: USDA Zone 11a
Aloha! Have you thought about building an aquaponics system?

Re: Aloha Nui

Postby Ben » Wed Feb 26, 2014 11:19 am

Ben
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 1:00 am
Location: 39.5S, 177E
Climate Zone: NZ Z10
Kia Ora Catz,


Good idea to know what you're eating! What altitude are you at? What are your growing limitations (ie heat or cool accumulation, rainfall, etc)? I envy anyone with a tropical climate.

Ka kite ano,


Ben

Re: Aloha Nui

Postby HillsideFarmHawaii » Sat Mar 01, 2014 12:19 am

User avatar
HillsideFarmHawaii
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 4:09 pm
Climate Zone: USDA zone 11
Aloha Cloudforest Folks,

I dunno about rare fruits, Lorax, it probably depends on how you define "rare". We do have a Lehua avocado which is a pretty uncommon avo. Round reddish dark purple fruit, no strings, nice and creamy. It's also off season so we have avos when they are hard to find. There's also an old variety of lemon that's a sweet lemon although I dunno the name of the variety. Also a very prolific tangerine and a grapefruit but it's just a white grapefruit. I think it was planted before the ruby red was invented. I've planted a few apple trees, those are "rare" fruits for this area. Both are low chill. There's also some low chill peaches, but the apples and peaches haven't started producing yet. Nor have the almonds.

What I am looking for is a true "Sea Island White" cotton seed source. It's supposed to be a very fine quality long stapled cotton. The bunnies that provide the fertilizer for the whole place are English angora, so we do fine fiber around here along with gardening.

Aquaponics would be good, Rodney, but we go on vacation for three to five weeks in the summer and it's hard enough to get house sitters with as many bunnies as we have, adding in fish as well might be difficult. We have loads of fertilizer from the bunnies and the vegetable gardens are raised bed gardens, so they are easy to take care of and produce a lot so we've got the vegetable production covered. We also have friends with a huge aquaponic system, so any time we even vaguely express an interest in a recipe involving tilapia, they give us a couple of fat ones. Have you had much luck growing root crops in your 'ponics system? My friend has been trying to grow beets and short carrots. Can sweet potatoes or Irish potatoes grow in 'ponics? Be a lot easier if you could just take 'taters out of water instead of digging them up.

We are at about one thousand feet, Ben. Rainfall is probably about 70 to 90 inches a year and we have County water so we can water the garden as necessary. Water isn't very expensive here. Our difficulty is lack of chilling hours if we want to grow stone fruits. It never freezes here and probably less than 100 hours of less than 55 degrees. (Which is good since the house doesn't have a heater.)

I think we also have every single possible kind of fruit fly here, too. Pests are a fairly big problem so fruit fly traps are put out and slug bait and etc., etc. The possible pests also determine which variety of plants or vegetables are planted. Tomatoes with thick skins do much better than thin skinned varieties.

At some point, it might be fun to graft some trees. Is it possible to graft different citrus together? The tangerine and lemon are pretty old trees, planting a young root stock and then grafting some different varieties onto it might be fun. Has anyone tried that?

Re: Aloha Nui

Postby HillsideFarmHawaii » Sat Mar 01, 2014 12:32 am

User avatar
HillsideFarmHawaii
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 4:09 pm
Climate Zone: USDA zone 11
Hmm, there's a link to lemon varieties on another forum topic and the lemon tree in the backyard might be a "Millsweet". There are almost always lemons on the tree, they are round, kinda sweet, thin skin and that's the closest match I could see in the available choices. Hmm, I'll ask around, it's a small town maybe someone will know what variety it is. Most of the other trees the previous owner of the house planted were grafted and named varieties.


Return to Introductions

Welcome Guest

Please register or login if you would like to post. It is currently Tue Sep 26, 2017 2:47 pm. (All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]).

Getting Around the Cafe

Login