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Please welcome new members here and if you have not introduced yourself yet, take a minute to let people know a little bit about yourself.

Hi from Australia

Postby SalFromQueensland » Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:06 am

SalFromQueensland
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 5:42 am
Climate Zone: Humid sub-tropical
I've got a quarter acre suburban block with about 40 varieties of fruit (trees, a few vines, and sundry) in a humid subtropical climate. Pushing into the tropical end of the spectrum, I have achacha, Grumichama, jaboticaba, pitomba, Kwai muk, yellow pitaya, malabar chestnut and wampi. On the temperate side of things I've got varieties adapted to the subtropics of apples, stonefruit, blueberries, and pecan. Citrus, papaya, avocado, macadamia, bananas, pomegranate, red shahtoot mulberries, loquat, figs and pineapple are very happy in this climate and my garden too.
I'm a bit obsessed with my fruit, and it is good to find others who are into it. I'm only in my third year of having land and an orchard, and have a lot to learn. Hope to talk with some of you soon.
Sal

Re: Hi from Australia

Postby Ben » Mon Jan 27, 2014 12:21 pm

Ben
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 1:00 am
Location: 39.5S, 177E
Climate Zone: NZ Z10
HI Sal, Ben from NZ here. What part of QLD are you in?

I've often wondered about growing fruit there, my wife was raised on a banana/beef farm between Lismore and Nimbin NSW. It seems every fruit they grow gets attacked by fruit bats, various insects, and fungal/bacterial issues. It appears a challenging place to grow fruit... is your region easier?

Re: Hi from Australia

Postby SalFromQueensland » Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:53 pm

SalFromQueensland
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 5:42 am
Climate Zone: Humid sub-tropical
Hi Ben. Yep, I can grow a wide range of things, including pests and diseases!
Brisbane isn't as wet as the north coast of New South Wales (lismore, Nimbin, etc) but bats, possums, fruitfly, pod suckers and black spot have shown up here. I bag my fruit against pests, but will need to move to nets as the trees get bigger. My papaya suddenly *stopped* showing black spot recently after some very hot dry days, bit of a happy mystery. Aside from Bordeaux on the stone fruit, I'm not spraying. In the end, if the plants can't cope with the conditions I shall replace them.
How are you faring in NZ? What's doing well in your garden?

Re: Hi from Australia

Postby Ben » Mon Jan 27, 2014 2:14 pm

Ben
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 1:00 am
Location: 39.5S, 177E
Climate Zone: NZ Z10
I'm along way south of you of course, something I remember everytime I visit the in-laws! I'm at about the same latitude as the extreme southernmost point of VIC, but climate is a little different. I lived in Brisbane for a while, nice city. Do you get cane toads?

Easy grow stuff here are things like cherimoya, avocado, black passionfruit, white sapote, tamarillo etc. Ie anything that comes naturally from tropical high altitude, and doesn't need heat but also doesn't like frost (totally frost-free here). Apples grow ok but the commercial cv.s get hit badly by insects. Plums, nectarines and other stonefruit seem resistant.

I've had fruit on papaya, mango and jakfruit, but never got it to full ripe stage. I think these are the borderline species for me. Should all be fine in a simple greenhouse. I did try them in a simple greenhouse, but a cow smashed it all up. I had 30+ banana cv.s at one time, but selected them down to one that performs well outside here. Paccha Naadan.

My place is certified organic, so sustainable options are all I get to play with!

Although I'm so far south, it's interesting that all the natural vegetation of NE NSW/SE QLD grows easily here, I guess because the extreme lows are similar. So my place has a lot of Aus. subtropical bangalow palms, Silky Oak, rainforest figs, etc, plus several hundred acres of Eucalyptus and wattle trees.

Re: Hi from Australia

Postby SalFromQueensland » Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:18 am

SalFromQueensland
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 5:42 am
Climate Zone: Humid sub-tropical
How interesting, I'd have thought frost would be a given that far south.
I don't seem to have cane toads in my yard. When I bought the place I couldn't step outside without crunching on some snails, but my ducks have fixed that.
Hey, what is cv.s stand for?
I've not heard of the Paccha Naadan banana. I've got ladyfinger, which are my traditional favourite, and plan on getting Pisang Ceylon and dwarf Ducasse. Not that many choices available here,if I understand cv.s to mean varieties, then I'm gob-smacked at your testing program.
I'm on the lookout to try cherimoya - pinks mammoth atemoya/custard apple, soursop and rollinia are the extent of my taste-testing of that family. Would you be able to describe cherimoya in relation to any of them? (Might be useful in retirement in Tasmania, don't think they'd do so well here).
Any apples you,d recommend? I'm limited here in what I can grow, but it's never too soon to start researching for the next place.
And, thanks for the nice welcome to the group. It's exciting to meet a whole bunch of people who are into fruit, permaculture etc. it's not a standard interest.
:D

Re: Hi from Australia

Postby Ben » Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:57 am

Ben
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 1:00 am
Location: 39.5S, 177E
Climate Zone: NZ Z10
cv is short for 'cultivar'. Jonathan from Hobart is a member here, under the name 'Tasmaniac' or similar. He'd be able to help with suggestions for TAS apples. I sent him cherimoya seeds a few years ago, not sure how they are going. Probably very well, I expect.

Cherimoya is not as sickly-sweet as atemoya, but otherwise very similar. At one time most of the QLD atemoya plantations were on cherimoya rootstock, so they must be ok there.

Why are you retiring to TAS?

I picked up a pro-permaculture bias living in rural NE NSW 25 years ago. Anyone who used the word 'organic' regularly in conversation tended to be too stoned most of the time to actually do anything. Except let their farms disappear under a sea of lantana and cockspur! People who used the term 'permaculture' tended to be extremely interesting to talk to, and had well thought out agroecological principles in place. And heaps of interesting fruit varieties. Maybe this just reflects on the people I knew at the time... I must add I ended up marrying a girl from one of the most conservative families in the district. Originally I went to Australia attracted by the flora. When I got there I found the fauna was pretty good too :)

Re: Hi from Australia

Postby George » Sun Feb 02, 2014 8:34 pm

User avatar
George
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 325
Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2011 4:32 pm
Location: san diego
Climate Zone: ssz 23
Do you know the variety of Pecan and can you fill me in on how well it is growing? Just wondering what variety might do well in a warmer climate.


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