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Please welcome new members here and if you have not introduced yourself yet, take a minute to let people know a little bit about yourself.

Intro from Upland, CA

Postby jungleroom » Sun Mar 18, 2012 11:57 pm

jungleroom
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 10:43 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 19
I stumbled upon this site while searching for info on guavas. Thanks to info here, I just purchased a longan and giant white guava from Mimosa nursery today. Never knew about the place and the fact that I got the 15 gal longan for half off was great.

My front yard is planted with fruit trees that can take a little bit of drought conditions:
Pomegranates
Persimmons
Guavas
Feijoa

The front side yard will be planted with citrus. Some of the tags say drought tolerant but I cant remember which ones. Doesn't really matter because I don't have the time to coddle them and if it doesn't survive then I will have to find something else that will. The sun is brutal here in the summer.

We recently enclosed the front yard with a wire cable fence and I am planning to train a boysenberry and lady Margaret passionflower on one side. The other side has ornamental vines and the rest of the front is planted with mostly drought tolerant plants.

The backyard is planted with a keiffer pear, Babcock peach, tropic snow peach, fuji apple, satsuma plum, and an unknown yellow peach that was supposed to be a snow queen nectarine. There is 45 yr old concord grape, thompson seedless grape, and unknown macadamia nut tree that is a real nuisance because it feeds the rats.

I also have blueberries that I plan on growing in half wine barrels. Same with the new longan.

I think that covers most of the edibles ... Almost forgot a really sad thornless blackberry that I've been trying to train up the Thompson seedless grape's trellis and a dragon fruit that is covered in spots.

Basically I try to choose plants that have low allergy potential and that I like to eat. I am following the Dave Wilson backyard orchard spacing. For instance, I have the persimmons, guavas, and pomegranates spaced somewhere between 3 and 4 feet apart. Fertilizing consists of spreading straw left over from blanketing the front yard with straw bales for holiday decorations. I am also an incorrigible plant killer. I am looking forward to learning more about growing fruit.

Ellen

Re: Intro from Upland, CA

Postby nullzero » Mon Mar 19, 2012 7:10 am

nullzero
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 786
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 1:26 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 21
Welcome to the forums Ellen. Sounds like you have a nice diversity of plants growing.

Re: Intro from Upland, CA

Postby emegar » Mon Mar 19, 2012 8:08 am

emegar
 
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2011 7:19 pm
Climate Zone: USDA zone 10a (per 2012 map!)
Hi Neighbor!

I'm on the east side of Rancho Cucamonga, also experimenting with what will do well in our heat (and in R.C., wind). I'm particularly hoping to make my lychees, mangoes, cherimoyas, jaboticabas, papayas, and dragonfruits work. Have you considered joining the California Rare Fruit Growers? I only recently joined, but have found the members and the magazine, Fruit Gardener, very informative, and inspiring. There's a chapter that meets in Riverside, and one that meets in Arcadia, at the L.A. Arboretum, which I actually find easier to attend, with my schedule.

James

Re: Intro from Upland, CA

Postby jungleroom » Mon Mar 19, 2012 10:02 pm

jungleroom
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 10:43 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 19
Thanks for the welcome. Nullzero, one of the reasons I have such a diversity of plants is because I have moderate to severe seasonal allergies. According to the book "Allergy-Free Gardening" by Thomas Leo Ogren, it is a good idea to maintain a diverse collection in order to avoid overexposure since allergies develop from repeated exposure. Along with my Sunset Western Garden book, I consult the Allergy book before buying any plant. That being said, sometimes I do buy a plant even if it isn't in the Allergy book simply because I can't resist, like the new longan.

James, I'm glad to see a neighbor on this site. I'm not familiar with jabuticabas, even after looking it up online . Where did you get yours and do you know of any local nurseries that are good? And do you know what causes dragon fruit to develop black spots all over the plant?

I haven't joined CRFG because it is difficult for me to attend the meetings. I did go to Cal Poly Pomona last year when the CRFG was there and was able to buy a pomegranate since the booths were open to the public.

Ellen

Re: Intro from Upland, CA

Postby emegar » Tue Mar 20, 2012 8:36 am

emegar
 
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2011 7:19 pm
Climate Zone: USDA zone 10a (per 2012 map!)
Ellen,

Jaboticabas are a well-known example of cauliflory, meaning they bloom and fruit directly on their trunks and large limbs. You should be able to find some amazing pictures if you do a google image search for a jaboticaba in bloom. I got mine from a guy named Mike in Alta Loma who runs a tropical/subtropical fruit nursery called Tropical Oasis Farms out of his home. Visits are by appointment only, but I think he's well worth visiting. If you're willing to undertake a bit of a drive, a much larger nursery is Mimosa, in east L.A.

I'm afraid I can't say with certainty what is ailing your dragonfruit. I'm a beginner in their cultivation, myself. Are the spots found all over the plants, or only in one area? Are they growing in size? If so, you may want to prune the affected portion, as it sounds like a bacterial or fungal disease. How often are you watering? Does the soil drain well? From what I understand, while dragonfruit are a tropical cactus, and need more regular water than arid climate cacti to be productive, they won't tolerate poorly drained soil.

Re: Intro from Upland, CA

Postby jungleroom » Wed Mar 21, 2012 12:11 am

jungleroom
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 10:43 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 19
Hi James,

I looked up some pics but couldn't think what they reminded me of until you wrote that they are an example of cauliflory ... Now I remember ... They look like brussell sprouts!

I actually talked to Mike earlier and he told me to wait until next month to get any guavas from him because it is too cold right now, said he had 33 degree F a couple of nights ago. I just went to Mimosa nursery the other day and all of the 15 gal longans were 50% off. I'd like to get a Hong Kong pink guava from the Meyers in Fountain Valley but I'm not sure where to plant it. So many guavas, not enough space!

The black spots are on the old stalks but I'm sure the new will be affected soon, too. It's still in the original pot so maybe drainage is an issue. Hopefully I can manage to keep this dragon fruit alive since I would love to get it to set fruit one day. It is the red fleshed kind, don't know the name. I don't notice the spots changing in size.

Btw - Cal State Fullerton is having a plant sale in April and Papaya Tree Nursery is going to be there.

Ellen

The

Re: Intro from Upland, CA

Postby emegar » Wed Mar 21, 2012 8:25 am

emegar
 
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2011 7:19 pm
Climate Zone: USDA zone 10a (per 2012 map!)
I'm looking forward to the Green Scene event in Fullerton, as well. May I ask which guavas you are currently growing? I have one from MIke he called a Brazillian White, and a lemon guava from Home Depot. If I were to get another, I think I'd be most interested in Malaysian Red (??) a red-fleshed, red foliage guava.

As for the dragonfruit, you might consider looking at Leo Manuel's yahoo group on pitahayas (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PitayaFruit/). You might find something helpful there, or if you were to become a member, you could post pictures of your cacti and see if others have any idea what the spots are.

James

Re: Intro from Upland, CA

Postby jungleroom » Wed Mar 21, 2012 9:25 pm

jungleroom
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 10:43 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset zone 19
Hi James,

I planted a 5 gal Tropic Pink from Lowe's 3 years ago and last year it had about 20 fruits mostly 3 inches in diameter. I planted a 5 gal lemon guava from Home Depot 2 years ago and last year it had 2 fruits that were only 1 inch in diameter but they were super sweet. I also planted a 1 gal pineapple guava from Home Depot 2 years ago and it's stayed very small but I did notice this evening that it looks like there are flower buds. These three are planted in a circle on 4 ft centers. I might move the pineapple guava, though, and put another guava in it's place if it stays so small or doesn't set fruit.

I still have the 3 gal Giant White from Mimosa Nursery and a 5 gal Tropic White from Home Depot in pots. Hopefully, I will get those in the ground tomorrow.
I'm also looking for a Malaysian Red. Mt Fuji Nursery in Upland is supposed to get some in a few weeks. I saw one at the N. Upland Home Depot yesterday but it looked dead. It was right next to two cherimoyas and I would've taken one except the tag said to plant 5 ft away from other plants and that scared me off.

Thanks for the heads up about the Yahoo group.

Ellen

Re: Intro from Upland, CA

Postby nullzero » Thu Mar 22, 2012 12:21 pm

nullzero
Cloudforest Expert
 
Posts: 786
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 1:26 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 21
I am going to goto Greenscene this year as well on Saturday. Malaysian Red guavas are fairly common to find in HD or Lowes. You can do a special order at Lowes/HD with La Verne for a Malaysian Red.


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