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Please welcome new members here and if you have not introduced yourself yet, take a minute to let people know a little bit about yourself.

Re: It's time for introductions!

Postby RodneyS » Tue Apr 19, 2011 2:13 pm

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RodneyS
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Posts: 549
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 6:41 am
Location: Cerritos, CA
Climate Zone: USDA Zone 11a
Welcome, Carol!

Growing your own cherimoya is a great addition to garden, not to mention the huge savings instead of buying them from the store/farmer's market.

Re: It's time for introductions!

Postby Axel » Tue Apr 19, 2011 3:43 pm

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Axel
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Joined: Thu Nov 18, 2010 8:49 pm
Location: Hanalei Bay, HI & Fallbrook, CA
Climate Zone: 12b/H2 & 10b/S23
Welcome to the Cloudforest, sounds like a lot of fun tending chickens, grafting, eating fresh tomatoes and pluots - what more could anyone ask for, if everybody tended their gardens, we'd have world peace. :)

The simple pleasures in life are simply the best
Tropical gardening in both Kaua'i windward Sunset H2/USDA 12b and Fallbrook Sunset 23/USDA 10b.

Re: It's time for introductions!

Postby carol168 » Tue Apr 19, 2011 8:11 pm

carol168
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 1:11 am
Climate Zone: USDA zone 8
Thanks for the welcome, Axel. Yes, so much to be thankful for. And I so look forward to learning more from everyone's postings on Cloudforest.
Thanks for your welcome too, Rodney. If you come across any cherimoya info please share it, even if something as simple as a fruit sale somewhere.

Re: It's time for introductions!

Postby RodneyS » Tue Apr 19, 2011 8:44 pm

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RodneyS
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Posts: 549
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 6:41 am
Location: Cerritos, CA
Climate Zone: USDA Zone 11a
Axel & a good number of Cloudforest members are quite knowledgeable on cherimoyas. That's how I originally came across this site.

Another site I found handy is-

http://www.cherimoya.com
In order to have access to all the info, the site requires email sign-up.

If you aren't able to source some seeds, I have plenty available to send you.

Re: It's time for introductions!

Postby carol168 » Tue Apr 19, 2011 9:50 pm

carol168
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 1:11 am
Climate Zone: USDA zone 8
Rodney, for now I'll just look for some fruits & save the seeds as I eat them. But I'll certainly keep that in mind--thanks!

Re: It's time for introductions!

Postby randa » Thu May 26, 2011 11:49 am

randa
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu May 26, 2011 9:58 am
Climate Zone: sunset zone 17
My name is Randa, and I began gardening as a wee tyke in San Jose, growing corn and berries. We moved before the corn was ready, and I insisted that we harvest the green corn anyway and carried it around for weeks. I tried my hand at gardening a few years later while living in Niamey, Niger. I managed to grow some flowers , but could never convince the veggies to grow in the red clay. My next garden, in Southern Oregon, was much more successful- we were a regular stop for the food bank in summer when the produce overwhelmed us.
I live in Aptos, about a half mile from the ocean. I have been working on planting a small orchard on the property. We have three citrus - a satsuma, a meyer lemon and an orgage tree of unknown provenance, two nectarines, a pluot and green gage plum that were planted two years ago, a Hudson Gold apple planted last year, a monterrey pear, a pink pearl and a russet planted this year. Next year we want to add another pear, a pineaple guava, and maybe an avocado or two. We also have a veggie garden. This year year we are taking the low key route and planting mainly summer squash, tomatoes, beans and basil. My herb garden is doing well this year. I have several thyme varieties to help the asthmatics in the household, two varieties of oregano, two of sage and some lemon balm and mint.
I have always stayed away from chemicals. We use household compost and occasionally a little seaweed fertilizer or fish emulsion to fertilize, and try to plant beneficials to keep the insect predation to a low roar.
It is great to have such a variety of places represented in one forum.
Randa

Re: It's time for introductions!

Postby Axel » Thu May 26, 2011 5:04 pm

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Axel
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Posts: 3533
Joined: Thu Nov 18, 2010 8:49 pm
Location: Hanalei Bay, HI & Fallbrook, CA
Climate Zone: 12b/H2 & 10b/S23
Welcome to the Cloudforest, Randa. Sounds like you have a great start at an orchard. Hudson's Golden Gem is a truly delicious apple, it's one of my favorite. Pink pearl makes a great pink colored strawberry flavored apple juice. I assume you have an owari satsuma, they come in many different types. The owari is the best one if you're close to the ocean.
Tropical gardening in both Kaua'i windward Sunset H2/USDA 12b and Fallbrook Sunset 23/USDA 10b.

Re: It's time for introductions!

Postby Panax » Mon Oct 31, 2011 7:24 pm

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Panax
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 6:40 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 19
Hi! I've followed your site for years, from living in Seattle for many years to where I live now in Woodland Hills, CA. I go through phases of unrestrained O.C.D. plantaholism... usually cramming as many plants as possible into the space I have. The climate here has some extremes, from minor frosts to above 100 degrees so often I like to experiment with plants or tougher cultivars that push the edges. One walled garden area shaded by a large maple and a new grove of bambusa oldhamii is filled with bromeliads, orchids, some stag horn ferns, a couple of interesting palms and some cycads. In another area, I am experimenting with some (sub)tropical fruits: 2 cherimoya varieties, 1 atemoya, suebel sapote, loquat, rose apple, a couple guavas, jujubes, a lychee, goji berry, red angel pomegranate, and a couple others. They are all young (less than 3 years) and I haven't had any fruits yet from anything but one of the guavas. If I were to add one of my goals to the mix, it is to make sure my plantings look aesthetically interesting and best case, quite beautiful. Since I work in the design profession, I tend to see my own garden as a good place to experiment with creating multi-layered landscapes that can be a treat to your eyes, your senses, and sometimes your taste buds....

Re: It's time for introductions!

Postby RodneyS » Mon Oct 31, 2011 7:51 pm

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RodneyS
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Posts: 549
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 6:41 am
Location: Cerritos, CA
Climate Zone: USDA Zone 11a
Welcome, Panax.

I'm surprised your jujubes haven't fruited for you. Are they grafted? The Honey Jar & Sugarcane jujubes that I bought were grafted that Winter & fruited the following Summer. Each year has brought more fruits, although the Sugarcane's flowers/fruits end up drying up for some reason.

Re: It's time for introductions!

Postby Panax » Mon Oct 31, 2011 10:58 pm

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Panax
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 6:40 pm
Climate Zone: Sunset Zone 19
Wow... how nice to get a quick response. One of my jujubes is 'Chang' which is grafted, but was only about 30" high when I planted it... It's had two growing seasons, including this one, and is now about 7' high. It had a number of flowers this summer but no fruit set. The other jujube is GA866 which just went in at the beginning of summer. Although I purchased it in a container, it had obviously been bare root so it it spent this season stabilizing. I expect next year it will take off.

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