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Re: It's time for introductions!

PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2015 8:14 pm
by yeti17
Thanks Dan, good luck to you too!

Re: It's time for introductions!

PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2015 9:43 am
by zone 9 in Brazil
Hello all. I'm new to Cloudforest, but it is a perfect site for me. I currently live in Rhode Island, but have lived in southern CA and Kauai (Kilauea). I recently purchase a farm in southern Brazil at a higher elevation, making it closer to zone 9B than the normal 10A of southern Brazil. On the farm are some older coffee trees that need rejuvenating and some mature mangos that have never produced fruit despite being 15-20 years old. I think that 9B is too cold for the fruit development and was wondering if top working the trees with a cold hardy variety would benefit me. Any assistance from the knowledgable members here would be appreciated.

Marc Doyle

Re: It's time for introductions!

PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2015 2:41 pm
by Ben
zone 9 in Brazil wrote:Hello all. I'm new to Cloudforest, but it is a perfect site for me. I currently live in Rhode Island, but have lived in southern CA and Kauai (Kilauea). I recently purchase a farm in southern Brazil at a higher elevation, making it closer to zone 9B than the normal 10A of southern Brazil. On the farm are some older coffee trees that need rejuvenating and some mature mangos that have never produced fruit despite being 15-20 years old. I think that 9B is too cold for the fruit development and was wondering if top working the trees with a cold hardy variety would benefit me. Any assistance from the knowledgable members here would be appreciated.

Marc Doyle



Hi Marc, good to have some Brazilians here! Where is your farm, how big is it and at what altitude?

If your mangos have survived 15-20 years then I doubt it is too cold for them, more likely a pollination issue. I know people in subtropical Australia who have had mangos in their yard for 40 years and never seen a fruit. The issue is rain and humidity during flowering time, mangos really need no rain at all during flowering. This is probably your problem in Brazil as well.

Re: It's time for introductions!

PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2015 4:31 am
by Skilgannon
Hi all my names Troy, I live in perth western australia. I m keen on pushing the boundaries with tropical and subtropical fruit trees. Im currently growing various Myrciaria, Pouteria, citrus, nephelium, dimocarpus, garcinia as well as many others.

Re: It's time for introductions!

PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:56 am
by zone 9 in Brazil
Hi Ben,
I just saw your comment and had to say hello. My farm is about 40 acres, but most of it has been converted to eucalyptus for lumber. I have about 5-6 acres where I have a two home sites, a large pond with tilapia, ducks and geese. I also have chickens, quail, guinea foul, and garden areas throughout with many fruit trees, bananas and a vegetable garden. We are at about 3-500 meters altitude. And you are right about the rain. We get a lot of it. This may be knocking off the flowers, or I may be getting a fungal infection (anthracnose). I will spray this year with anti fungal and will try covering part of the tree to see if sheltering it from the rain makes a difference. I have plans to try to incorporate some permaculture designs into the property. I have a stream with a good drop that lends itself to hydroelectric generation that I would like to tap into, if I can find some resources to build it.

Thanks for the thought on the mangos. I hope I can get them to produce some day.

Re: It's time for introductions!

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2016 3:24 pm
by Steve in Brookings
Welcome, Marc. What part of southern Brazil are you going to be in? Santa Catarina? Parnaná? Rio Grande do Sul? Despite the existence of a short winter frost window, the uplands of Brazil's southern Atlantic seaboard typically have a much longer, more tropicalish growing season than Zone 9b climates on the West Coast of the U.S. typically do...as evidenced by the ability to grow coffee on a commercial scale. Your climate is probably more akin to that of Orlando than to Fresno or San Jose.

Your rain is probably about past its peak. "The "aguas de março" signal the end of summer in southern Brazil and are legendary for the strength of their downpours. Winter will be much drier. If you can grow juçaras on your sitio, there are probably a lot of other palms, tree ferns, bromeliads and orchids that will grow well for you. SE Brazil is like NZ in that it is one of those rare places in the temperate world where you could grow a spectacularly tropical garden using native plants exclusively.

Re: It's time for introductions!

PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2016 8:57 pm
by Don
Hello everyone, have been a member for a little while but have only read posts and not participated so thought I may aswell introduce myself and say g'day. My name is Don and i live in Brisbane Australia I have been into gardening for most of my life and only recently (last three years) concentrated my efforts on eugenias. I have around 30 types mostly seedlings and small trees with only a few producing first fruits for me this year. Would love to hear from anyone else that is interested in this family of plants as there is not a whole lot of information on these and in return I hope I can help out anybody who might need it through what I have learnt about eugenias.

Re: It's time for introductions!

PostPosted: Sat Jul 01, 2017 8:16 am
by RobertS
Hi Don, welcome to forum as it is! Used to be more active but not lately! I'm on Central Coast of Calif. and I too have been growing Eugenia's although not 30varieties. I have many 5-6 types of e.uniflora, e. selloi, e. aggregate,e.uvalha,e. brasiliensis, some of others names skip me right now! Yeah, would be great to hear what your growing down under! Where you located at in Oz.? Sorry for super late reply!